Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Sex is defined as genital contact of any kind.

A sexually transmitted disease is a disease that is contracted through sexual exposure. It is possible that if you have been sexually active at all, even just once, you could be at risk of having an STD.

Symptoms may include fever, pain in the abdominal/pelvic region, change in discharge, burning with urination, sores, warts, or blisters. But many people who have an STD have no symptoms at all! And STDs are contagious even though no symptoms exist.

Avoid the risks. The best strategy for preventing sexually transmitted diseases is to wait until marriage to have sex and to share a faithful marriage with one life partner.

This information is intended for general education purposes only and should not be relied upon as a substitute for professional and/or medical advice.

For help assessing your risk for an STD or for more information on how you can avoid infection by STD, please call our WISH clinic at 316.946.WISH [9474]

Common STDs
Which STDs are stopped by using condoms?
How many people are infected with an STD?
Are teens more at risk for STDs?
What age group is at greatest risk for acquiring an STD?
Can STDs be cured?

Call our W.I.S.H. Clinic today at 316.946.9474 to schedule an appointment for STD testing.

 


 

Common STDs
STD
Symptoms
Complications
Bacterial vaginosis
Abnormal white or gray vaginal discharge with an unpleasant odor; burning during urination or itching around the outside of the vagina, or both. Some women have no symptoms at all. Can increase a woman's susceptibility to HIV and other STDs, such as Chlamydia and gonorrhea; pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) following surgical procedures such as a hysterectomy or an abortion. While pregnant it may put a woman at increased risk for some complications of pregnancy.
Chlamydia
Clear discharge, frequent urination; often no symptoms Permanent damage to reproductive organs, sterility, ectopic or tubal pregnancy or potentially fatal eye and lung infections in babies.
Gonorrhea
Local, genital discharge, pain; often no symptoms in men; usually none in women. Pelvic inflammatory disease, sterility, arthritis, blindness, eye infection in newborns
Hepatitis B
30% of infected people have no signs or symptoms. Jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes), severe fatigue, loss of appetite, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Rash, joint pain and fever may also occur. May cause lifelong infections that could cause liver failure, cancer and death.
Herpes
Swollen, tender, painful sores on genitals Can cause severe central nervous system damage or death in infants infected during birth.
HIV/AIDS
Short-lived, flu-like symptoms (fatigue, fever, aches). No symptoms with initial infection or for many years thereafter. AIDS typically appears about 10 years after the initial HIV infection (although new therapies may further delay the development of AIDS).
HPV
Local irritation, itching. Most patients have no symptoms. Approximately 1% of all individuals who have been infected with HPV and 7% of those with current HPV infection have genital warts. Evidence links infection to Cervical Cancer. Highly contagious; can spread enough to block vaginal and rectal openings.
PID
Vary from none to severe. When symptoms appear they usually are: lower abdominal pain, fever, unusual vaginal discharge that may have a foul odor, painful intercourse, painful urination, irregular menstrual bleeding, and pain in the right upper abdomen (rare). Without treatment, PID can cause permanent damage to the female reproductive organs. Women with repeated episodes of PID are more likely to suffer infertility, ectopic pregnancy, or chronic pelvic pain.
Syphilis
1st Stage: painless pimple or sore on genitals, fingers, lips, breast. 2nd stage: rash, sores, swollen joints, flu-like illness. Latent late stage: none Nerve, brain, heart damage, and skin tumors.  Can be passed to babies & bring skin rash or deformity of teeth and nose.
Trichomoniasis
Copious discharge, intense itching, burning and redness of genitals and thighs; painful intercourse; often no symptoms in men. Possible urinary tract infection and pain in lower abdomen

 

Which STDs are stopped by using condoms?

 

-Condoms provide the best (though not complete) protetion against HIV and Gonorrhea.

-They are less effective protecting against Herpes Type 2, Trichomoniasis and Chlamydia.

-Condoms provide little protection against Bacterial Vaginosis and HPV (the most common STD).

The only 100% protection from STDs 100% of the time is a committed marriage with a faithful partner.


 

How many people are infected with an STD?
-In the United States it is estimated there are more than 65 million current STDs.

-Each year 19 million new cases occur, about half of which occur among youth ages 15-24 years.

-It is estimated that 20 million people are currently infected with HPV and that 50% of sexually active individuals will acquire an HPV infection at some point in their lives.

-More than 1.6 million Americans have been infected with HIV, and more than 540,000 have already died.  Roughly 56,000 new HIV infections occur each year.

-In 2007, the most infectious stages of syphilis were diagnosed in about 11,500 Americans.

-The CDC estimates that one in five people have genital herpes.

-In 2009, a total of 1.2 million chlamydial infections were reported to the CDC.  This is the largest number of cases ever reported to CDC for any condition.

-Sept. 24, 2010 CDC report showed that of the 21 cities hardest hit by AIDS, One in five gay/bisexual men have HIV infections---and nearly half of them don’t know they are infected.

Sources: Guttmacher Institute- www.guttmacher.org

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services-Center for Disease Control and Prevention-National Center for HIV/AIDS, viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB prevention division of STD Prevention-Atlanta, Georgia 30333.  Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2009.  www.cdc.gov.  

CDC, MMWR Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Sept. 24, 2010; vo. l 59:pp 1201-1207. Statement by Kevin Fenton, MD, PhD, director, CDC’s center for HIV/AIDS, virus hepatitis, STD, and TB prevention.


 

 Are Teens more at risk for STDs?
 

-Sexually active adolescents aged 15-24 are at higher risk of acquiring STD’s for a combination of behavioral, biological, and cultural reasons.

-Adolescent females are more susceptible to certain STD’s because of an immature cervix.

-In 2009 as in previous years, women age 15-19 had the highest rate of chlamydia compared to any other age group or sex group.

-Chlamydia, which is usually asymptomatic, can result in PID, which is a major cause of infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and chronic pelvic pain.

Sources: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services-Center for Disease Control and Prevention-National Center for HIV/AIDS, viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB prevention division of STD Prevention-Atlanta, Georgia 30333.  Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2009.  www.cdcgov. 


 
What age group is at greatest risk for acquiring an STD?
 

-Adolescents and young adults 15-24 are at the highest risk for acquiring an STD. 

-Estimates suggest that young people 15-24 years represent only 25% of the sexually experienced population but acquire nearly half of all new STD’s.

-Syphilis rates among women aged 15-19 years have increased annually since 2004 with the highest number of cases in women age 20-24.

Sources: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services-Center for Disease Control and Prevention-National Center for HIV/AIDS, viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB prevention division of STD Prevention-Atlanta, Georgia 30333.  Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2009.  www.cdcgov. 


 
Can STDs be cured?

-Chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, trichomoniasis and other bacterial or parasitic infections can be treated and cured with antibiotics and similar medicine. Although these STD’s are able to be treated, they can leave lasting effects such as infertility, susceptibility to future ectopic pregnancy, chronic pelvic pain and other lifelong consequences.

-Some STD’s are becoming increasingly drug resistant to treatment.

-Viral STD’s pose a major problem because there is not medical cure for a viral infection. This means if a person becomes infected with a viral STD such as Herpes, HPV or HIV there is no cure. 

-Antiviral drugs for herpes can suppress outbreaks and reduce transmission and antiretroviral drugs for HIV can delay the onset of AIDS and also reduce transmission.

Sources: Guttmacher Institute- www.guttmacher.org

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services-Center for Disease Control and Prevention-National Center for HIV/AIDS, viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB prevention division of STD Prevention-Atlanta, Georgia 30333.  Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2009.  www.cdcgov.